The Konk Pack experience is analogous to what it would feel like if strapped to the hood of a spaceship and blasted off into the outer regions of the aural unknown. The absolutely aleatoric sound-worlds that Tim Hodgkinson (lap steel guitar, clarinets, electronics), Thomas Lehn (analogue synthesizer), and Roger Turner (percussion) produce are vigorously alive with buzzing particles of humming static, mysterious glitches, pulses, and splatters of engaging and often terrifying sound. Despite the radical notion of freedom that grounds their performance, complex and marvelous structures begin to form for the open listener who, despite the dense and overwhelming textures, will find many silent spaces that enable exhilarating autonomous judgment. The disorienting, blurry, and rapid camera movements of this video -- which shows Konk Pack at a sound check prior to a 2008 performance in Germany -- visually captures the chaos of their sonic capabilities. While there’s really no time for one to fully adjust to the perpetually shifting directions of sound, aesthetic joy is realized by lingering within the absorptive unpredictability of it all.

Join us tonight, April 15, at The Rotunda for what is sure to be a challenging and rewarding evening of free sound. 

Since it was revealed that Giuseppi Logan had returned to a more public existence, we've been overwhelmingly eager to host him in Philadelphia, his city of origin. Now that pianist Dave Burrell has been added to the date, we're duly excited to present what should be a very special homecoming celebration. Giuseppi's story is pretty deep. ANW friend Elliott Sharp contributes today's post in preparation of Thursday's visit by this exceptional human being...

“Giuseppi Logan is no longer active in music,” claims a footnote in Valerie Wilmer’s politically-charged 1977 book on the new jazz, As Serious As Your Life.  After recording two stunning albums released by ESP-Disk in the mid-60s, Logan vanished just a few years later.  His whereabouts were unknown, myths circulated, and family, friends, fans, and collaborators reluctantly began to accept the very real possibility that Logan was dead.  It would take roughly 45 years for such speculations to be proven wrong, as Logan was finally discovered, homeless and performing for change in New York City’s Tompkins Square Park.  Proof of his existence disrupted these dreadfully, and thankfully, false conclusions in much the same way that his early playing ruptured established notions about the future directions and possibilities of jazz music.

Born in Philadelphia, Logan taught himself piano, drums, and reeds at an early age, eventually moving on to study at the prestigious New England Conservatory.  In the early-60s, Logan began performing in New York City with emerging artists on the free scene such as Bill Dixon, Archie Shepp, and Pharoah Sanders.  His first release as a group leader, 1964’s The Giuseppi Logan Quartet (re-released on ESP-Disk in 2008) features Logan (alto sax, tenor sax, bass clarinet, flute, Pakistani oboe) stepping out on his own alongside Don Pullen (piano), Milford Graves (percussion), and Eddie Gomez (bass).  The five pieces the quartet laid down revealed Logan’s ability as a composer and ensemble leader, sounding just as enraged and challenging as John Coltrane’s OM and Sunny Murray’s Sunny’s Time Now.  

In 1965, ESP-Disk released More, consisting of a live performance captured at The Town Hall in May of that same year -- Albert Ayler’s group shared the bill that night, performing “Bells” --, and featuring the same quartet line-up with Reggie Johnson assuming bass duty on a few of the pieces.  The four improvisations here showed the group moving into further-out terrains, realizing a furious amalgam of aleatoric clangs, spinning piano lines, rumbling bass phrases, and Logan’s dizzying flute and reed work.  With these two releases, Logan and his team of improvisers proved themselves to be part of the vanguard of the new thing, incorporating non-Western sound-aspects and radically applying them to traditional conceptions of the jazz idiom.  Though, just as quickly as Logan began pushing these boundaries, he disappeared, leaving no trace but the sounds themselves.

Mystery ensued.  Where was Giuseppi Logan?   His sonically challenging and creative powers left an undeniable mark on his fellow musicians, greatly influencing the trajectory of experimental jazz in the years following his two monumental releases.  Logan’s history had its dark moments – it is known that he spent time in mental institutions due to substance abuse problems – and this is why some predicted the worst. 

In a short documentary film made by Edward English (available on youtube), in which Logan walks through Tompkins Square Park with his young son, he discusses the economic challenges that artists face.  Among other topics, Logan briefly speaks about his desire to be able to economically support his family with his art.  The monetary hardships that Logan’s generation of avant-garde jazz musicians experienced, and that current experimentalists continue to experience, are well known.  For, it is always already difficult to survive as an artist in a cultural world that values consumption and capital over artistic creativity, and being an outsider artist only exacerbates this difficulty.  There is no denying that Logan’s disappearance was at least partly the result of his being an artist with a unique and unrelenting vision in an age that punishes rather than rewards such visionaries.

But after years of being lost to the world, stories of Logan began to surface in 2008.  The rumors were validated when a series of videos, featuring Logan playing music in Tompkins Square Park, appeared on youtube thanks to fan, artist, and writer Suzannah B. Troy.  The details surrounding Logan’s 40 plus years off the map are still murky, but since his re-entry to the public world, he has performed several times and is currently off the streets and living in Brooklyn.  In addition, February of this year saw, in an interesting twist of linguistic fortune, the Tompkins Square imprint release Logan’s first studio album in 46 years.  Giuseppi Logan is back!

On The Giuseppi Logan Quintet, Logan (saxophone, piano) is joined by Dave Burrell (piano), Francois Grillot (bass), Matt Lavelle (trumpet, bass clarinet), and Warren Smith (drums).  The album features 5 of Logan’s original compositions and the quintet provide their own perspective to 3 standards.  While it is clear that Logan was without his instruments for quite a while, his atonal and surprisingly blue reed-work is undeniably compelling and deep.  Some might claim that it is simply his rustiness, but there is a fascinating deconstructive approach that Logan takes to the quintet’s version of Miles Davis’ “Freddie the Freeloader,” and it shows Logan embracing the same sort of irreverence for listeners’ expectations and the upkeep of traditional “purity” that made his past work so revolutionary and controversial.

In a recent interview, Logan speaks about his disappearance: “I was dead because I wasn’t playing…I didn’t have any instruments for about 30 years.”  For him, being able to create music and share it with others is the essence of being alive.  Ars Nova Workshop is incredibly honored and excited to bring Logan to Philadelphia and provide him the space to share his sounds with the world.  On Thursday, April 1 at Philadelphia Art Alliance, Logan will be joined by the full-lineup from the recent quintet recordings for what is sure to be a fantastic evening of celebratory, life-affirming sound.

This video was taken of an April 2009 performance at the Local 269 in New York City by Logan, Grillot, Lavelle, and Smith.

Elliott Sharp is a West Philadelphia resident who writes about music for Tiny Mix Tapes, Foxy Digitalis, and Biomusicosophy.

Photo: New York Portraits

Light Speed

We borrowed that brilliant title from the early March 2000 City Paper preview of our first show - Chris Speed's Yeah No at the Plays and Players Theatre. Nate Chinen, who has since graduated to The New York Times, writes "Yeah No’s sound is easier to identify than it is to define. Speed’s full, dry tenor is only one pigment on a vivid canvas — along with throbbing electric bass, atmospheric trumpet and precarious percussive textures." I think it's safe to say that some things haven't changed all that much in ten years - in this case, for the best. This Friday, we'll be hosting an extremely rare visit from Yeah No for THE special 10th anniversary celebration. We'll be sharing our excitement with you by serving cupcakes from Philly Cupcake (to the first 100 ticket buyers) and local beer, the first cup of which will be on us.  So, really, you have no excuse. To say that Friday's show is a bargain would be an understatement. See you there.


We're not the only ones celebrating our 10th anniversary this month. Our friends in Atomic are commemorating their 10th year of making exceptional music with a few North American performances, including the kick-off in Philadelphia. We've presented only one ensemble in our 10-year yesterday two consecutive evenings: Atomic in February 2007. Were you there? Either way, please do yourself a favor and join us for this celebratory performance, which kicks off a month of very special 10th anniversary performances. More soon.


Due to weather, tonight's performance of the Burton Greene/Perry Robinson Duo is cancelled. Stay tuned for a rescheduled date.

On Canvas

Over the summer, ANW presented Darcy James Argue's spectacular "steampunk" big band, Secret Society, at the International House. This performance was the band's first US appearance outside of New York and, thanks to WHYY's On Canvas program (which has also featured performances from Andrew Bird, Lionel Loueke and Extra Golden), we can relive the excitement. Thanks to all who came out to support that event. Watch the entire episode here.

Byram's World

As Tim said today, "It's going to be Sunday before you know it." Let's hope it doesn't come too soon. In any case, we're overwhelmingly eager to present Friday and Saturday's Composer Portrait: Tim Berne at the Philadelphia Art Alliance. Without hyperbole, Tim's work - especially all those late 90s live performances of Bloodcount and Big Satan that we saw at the Old Office - was a major influence on our excitement to present improvised music in Philadelphia. This one is real special. And, honestly, it may be quite some time before most of these pieces are performed live again, so do yourself a favor and join us. 

Please note! The public discussion between The New York Times' Nate Chinen and visual artist Steve Byram - whose work graces the covers of Berne's entire Screwgun Records catalog - is pushed back from Friday to Saturday, December 12 from 6:30-7:30pm. But still free!

Where is Brooklyn?

"And this music has root in this form just as man has broken away from the earth gravity to seek other forms of matter so has the form of expression in all communicated thoughts, Don Cherry is a man of creative inventiveness and it would be unnatural for him not to seek and bring about the new forms in his talent as a composer and performer the compositions as well as the titles are all in the form of the new thing, in music of the improvising world." -Ornette Coleman, from the original liner notes of Blue Note Records' Where is Brooklyn? by Don Cherry

We don't know what, precisely, Ornette is talking about here, but we're sure he's right! We do know, however, that ANW has commenced our Composer Portrait: Don Cherry season-long celebration with Dave Douglas & Brass Ecstasy's exciting performance (which included Cherry tunes The Thing, Awake Nu, and others). If you missed it, don't fret. Celebrating their 10th anniversary, Steven Bernstein's Millennial Territory Orchestra visits Philadelphia for the first time to perform Cherry's "Relativity Suite" (still unreleased on CD). The piece, commissioned by the Jazz Composers Orchestra Association  (under the leadership of Carla Bley) 40 years ago and recorded on Valentine's Day 1973, is an ambitious suite undoubtedly influenced by Cherry's work with Pakistani vocalist Pandit Faquir Pran Nath, also a major influence on Terry Riley, La Monte Young and Lee Konitz.

Just A Guy Who Knows is a new 21-minute short film that was directed, shot and edited by Mike Ercolini and Dan Scofield.  Many of us know Dan as one-fourth of the Philadelphia quartet Shot x Shot. (And, by the way, we just announced this mind-blowing event with said ensemble.)  Anyway, the short film is about legendary saxophonist Sonny Simmons, who we featured last season in a duet performance with Bobby Few.  That gig was named one of Wire Magazine's best concerts of 2008. Simmons is well known for his collaborations with the leading figures in the jazz avant-garde including Charles Mingus, Eric Dolphy, Elvin Jones, Jimmy Garrison, McCoy Tyner - the list is endless and beyond impressive. Enjoy!

Tin Anniversary

Last Friday we commenced our 10th anniversary season with the Mary Halvorson Quintet (right).  She later told us that she'll be taking the quintet (with John Hebert and Ches Smith) into the studio late this year, so keep an eye out for that.  Thanks to all who persevered an exceptionally miserable day. For those who missed it, there is a good chance Mary will return in some capacity before the season concludes.  In any case, Mary's quintet was an incredible introduction to what is sure to be a monumental year for Ars Nova Workshop.